SPAWN hires local artist to design new Interpretive Sign for Roy’s Riffles Restoration Project

SPAWN hires local artist to design new Interpretive Sign for Roy’s Riffles Restoration Project

 

For Immediate Release: June 30, 2022

Contact: Preston Brown, (303) 877-0880, preston@tirn.net

Olema, Calif. (June 30, 2022) – Following the second phase of creek restoration at the former San Geronimo Golf Course, the Salmon Protection And Watershed Network (SPAWN) has completed the Roy’s Riffles Restoration Project. This project marks a major achievement to remove a former dam on San Geronimo Creek that limited fish passage for coho salmon. 

To mark the completion of the project, SPAWN hired Frank Binney of Frank Binney and Associates to design a new interpretive sign at the former dam site to highlight the project and give context to visitors of what restoration work was done to remove the dam and restore the free-flowing creek channel. 

“It’s rewarding to mark the completion of this restoration project with a beautiful artistic display. We’re thrilled with the way the sign turned out and have heard many encouraging words from neighbors who have been drawn to it”, says Preston Brown, Watershed Conservation Director of SPAWN.

“The process of ecological restoration can be such a compelling story,” says Brown. Often restoration projects look so much different from what was there before that it’s hard to recognize a site after it starts to grow in. That’s why this interpretive sign made by Frank Binney and artist Faith Rumm, is so compelling, because it includes images of the former dam site, converted into the Roy’s Pools, then finally restored to its current state”. 

Frank Binney is a local artist based in the San Geronimo Valley with decades of experience in artistic interpretation and education. The sign was installed with the help of the local San Geronimo Lion’s Club Chapter.

SPAWN received funding for the sign from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

The Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (SPAWN) is a program of the global ocean conservation non-profit Turtle Island Restoration Network that protects endangered, wild coho salmon and the forests and watersheds they need to survive in West Marin County, California. Learn more at www.seaturtles.org/salmon. 

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